March visitors

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People from 21 countries visited the site in March.

There were four times as many from the USA than the next largest, UK. Both are countries who have an obvious need for cheerful reading.

The island of Iona

As usual the most read post was Highland Home Industries – perhaps ex-pats of Scottish origin were the majority.

The second, which prompted many visitors to clicks on the hyperlinks and explore further,  was:

The Diagonal Lock: moving towards a more productive, environmentally friendly canal system

It opens:

On October 15th the writer visited the ‘Diagonal Lock Roadshow’ in Knowle, meeting Terry Fogarty, a design engineer, company director and canal enthusiast.

Mr Fogarty was presenting a model of his invention: a diagonal lock , which works on the principle of a sloping tube, cutting out time spent by canal users negotiating flights of locks.

“This is a radical alternative that could help to alleviate transport problems on the motorways,” he said. “You could install freezers in a wide-beam boat so you could even transport food.”

The Diagonal Lock is a new technology devised as an alternative to traditional canal locks, enabling boats to ascend/descend an incline whilst floating securely inside a watertight, concrete chamber.

Continue:https://antidotecounteragent.wordpress.com/2011/11/06/the-diagonal-lock-moving-towards-a-more-productive-environmentally-friendly-canal-system/

 

 

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3D house printer bound for El Salvador

In the Times, Will Pavia reported that a small white house which appeared recently in a pleasant neighbourhood of Austin, Texas was built without bricklayers. It was an experiment in ‘house printing’ that is being held up as a model which could replace slums of corrugated iron shacks with in the poorest parts of the world.

The printer was developed by Icon, a firm founded by Jason Ballard, a sustainable housing specialist, with the 3D printing engineer Alex Le Roux and the businessman and venture capitalist Evan Loomis.

The giant 3D printer, an enormous aluminium machine, spat out mortar like grey toothpaste, applying even layers of concrete in precise lines that rose steadily to form the outer and inner walls of a 350 square foot home that met all the local building codes (see the process briefly on this video). The roof is made of wood.

Mr Ballard said that the process required mortar that could flow like ink but was thick enough to form a wall. Like paper printers, their machine suffered from jams; when it rained heavily in Austin, he said, “We had to clean it, like, every eight layers”.

Icon has started working with New Story, a San Francisco charity that builds homes in countries such as Haiti and El Salvador – ‘the non-profit working to create a world where no human being lives in survival mode’. It needed a printer that could work outside and manage interruptions to the power supply.

The printer will be shipped to El Salvador, where New Story hopes to print a few test homes by the end of the year before starting on a larger batch to house an entire community.

 

 

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Canadian doctors ask for pay rise to be redirected to other health-care workers

Peter Rakobowchuk reported from Montreal in the Canadian Star this week that more than 250 doctors and residents in Quebec have asked the provincial government to backtrack on plans to give them and other physicians substantial pay hikes, saying the money should be spent on the front lines of the health system.

Quebec Health Minister Gaetan Barrette says he’s ready to take some of the money out of the doctors’ hands, adding ambiguously, “If they feel they are overpaid, they can leave the money on the table and I guarantee you I can make good use of it”. He is working with Quebec nurses to deal with issues like overtime and nurse-to-patient ratios. He said it was agreed to revisit working conditions under an “historic” collective agreement that was reached two years ago.

An open letter, signed by general practitioners, specialists and residents, says the increases are particularly shocking given that other health-care workers such as nurses and orderlies face difficult working conditions.

A Facebook post by a young nurse named Emilie Ricard was shared more than 56,000 times after the woman from the Eastern Townships posted a picture of herself in tears, giving a sarcastic thumbs-up after a night shift in which she said she had to care for more than 70 patients alone.

In a radio interview (translated) one example she gave was “For example, a patient sounds because he wants to go to the bathroom, but we do not have time. He gets up and falls. When you explain that to the family, […] they understand, but why should they understand? It’s not normal”.

Isabelle Leblanc, president of the group who sent the letter, said in an interview that nurses, orderlies and other employees in the health-care system are working under awful conditions and with excessive workloads. She added that there is only a specific amount of money available to the Health Department and “the more you give to the physicians, the less you give to workers or to improve access (to the system) . . . We think it’s going to help patients a lot more if the money is injected in the system, and not into the pockets of the physicians.”

 

 

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Tenino’s wooden currency

A growing number of communities (Brixton, Totnes, Bristol) now use scrip (a community currency or loyalty programme) as a way to keep business activity local and increase community resilience to economic shocks we look at one of many historical precedents

In 1931, during the depression, the Citizens Bank in the small U.S. town of Tenino, Washington, closed its doors after running completely out of money. As it only had one bank there was no longer any cash currency available for the exchange of goods and services.

The Chamber of Commerce received permission from Congress to begin printing their own money. A committee was formed that included the town’s physician, Dr. Wichman, dentist Dr. Meyer, and Don Major, the publisher of the local newspaper the Thurston County Independent. After a few attempts with paper money, the Chamber decided to make currency out of wood, which was readily available.

Major began printing pieces of temporary currency on thin, 1/80th-of-an-inch-thick pieces of “slicewood,” two strips of spruce, laminated, with a piece of paper in the middle. He started with 25¢ denominations, and later produced somewhat larger amounts, including 50¢ and $1.

A number of other cities and towns across the U.S. ended up printing scrip notes or IOUs on slips of paper. Even after the Depression had finally abated, Tenino’s tradition of wooden money survived. The town continued to print souvenir and commemorative bills, usually annually, to meet the demands of collectors. Word of the wooden money spread quickly, and soon requests from currency collectors across the country poured in.

The Tenino Depot Museum, which now houses the original press, holds a number of “request letters” from people who would write to Tenino to see if they could get their hands on the unique currency. Loren Ackerman has been running the original printing press since the 1990s, when he took it over from the previous caretakers after they grew too old to operate it safely. “Running the press is… how should I put it… not OSHA-approved,” he says. “If you slip at all, you’re going to bite your fingers.” As he fires up the machine, he shares the history of the wooden money.

Recently printed wooden money can be bought at local businesses. Anyone can walk in to a local ‘50s style café, Scotty B’s. and buy wooden money in denominations of $1, $5, or $10, to keep as a souvenir, or spend in town. It can be used at most of the local businesses as legal tender, as intended in 1931.

Ackerman has taught one of his sons to use the press so that the tradition can continue when the time comes.

 

 

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Mumbai’s Tree Saviour 1: neighbourhood trees

This is a brief account of a citizen of Mumbai battling – in his spare time – to prevent the destruction of trees in his city.

After realising that the fine rain trees which shaded the roads in his neighbourhood were being cut down, Zoru Bhathena discovered online that over 2000 trees had been axed due to infection by mealybugs and the municipal authority was taking no action to limit this. He points out that the problem is simply resolved: once a tree has been infected it needs to be felled to prevent the infection from spreading to healthy trees. See the latest video here:

He draws attention to the Tree Act (1975) which gives extensive instructions ofr increasing tree cover in Maharashtra – summarised below.

Zoru decided to file a public interest litigation (PIL) as well as actively campaigning with protesting neighbourhood groups and publicising the case on Facebook.

It is reported that judges presiding over the Bombay High Court (HC) hearing in 2016 asked BMC:  “Unless you conduct a tree census in a proper scientific manner with the help of experts, how will you know the situation?” The HC said it will have to examine the manner in which BMC conducts the tree census. Advocate Joaquim Reis and advocate Trupti Puranik, representing said BMC had planted about 1,546 new trees in place of the dead trees, but the petitioner’s counsel, Kainaz Irani, pointed out: “The corporations plant young saplings which do not survive”. Another report added some interesting details.

The HC said that it would focus on two issues — preservation of existing trees and the census of trees so that they can be protected and increasing the green cover, by planting more trees.  

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Mumbai’s Tree Saviour 2: opposing destruction in Greater Mumbai’s Garden of Eden

The 2016 High Court judgment directed the BMC “to ensure that the remaining trees on the Western Express Highway are not cut or destroyed”.

However, the Indian Express reported, a year later, that the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) had already felled some trees, an action which Bhathena (right) termed a clear “contempt of court.” The MMRDA later applied to the court for a modification of the 2016 HC order in order to fell 216 more trees along the Western Express Highway for the construction of Metro 7.

The Afternoon Despatch and Courier gives the exact figures and refers to the Right to Information (RTI) filed by activist Zoru Bhathena, who had required information on the total number of trees to be cut and transplanted in the Mumbai city due to the metro project, including the construction of every metro line and car shed. According to the reply by Mumbai Metro Rail Corporation (MMRC) 1,331 trees will be cut throughout the route and 3,681 trees will be transplanted.

Bhathena commented in the Times: “The government is trying to create the impression that we are opposed to the Metro project. That is not the case. We want the car shed to be shifted to an alternate site like Kanjurmarg where it will not cause harm. Here, a pristine forest will be destroyed”.

In a focus on the fate of the Aarey Colony, where 28 hectares have been earmarked by the MMRDA and the MMRC for constructing a metro car shed over an area of. This will lead to uprooting of 2,298 trees. According to MMRDA, 2,044 of these trees could be transplanted, but the rest would be cut down. An activist comments: “And we all know the fate of most transplanted trees. It’s a farce and has so far not succeeded”.

Save Aarey informs us that this stretch of deciduous forests peopled by tribal villages, still described as a ‘Garden of Eden’, was broken up in 1949 to accommodate the Aarey dairy co-operative; “This created open ecosystems of grasslands, scrubs, marshes and water bodies, giving refuge to an interesting assemblage of species. A total of 77 species of birds, 34 species of wildflowers, 86 species of butterflies, 13 species of amphibians, 46 species of reptiles, several of these being listed under Schedule II of the Wildlife Protection Act are found here. What’s more, 16 species of mammals, including the elusive but ornamental and therefore, magnificent leopard, have been documented in Aarey. From the hundreds of micro habitats that are there in Aarey, tiny creatures rule, thrive and survive. Interestingly, species thought to have been extinct have been rediscovered from Aarey”.

In addition to public demonstrations, including visits from schoolchildren, 123,576 people have signed a petition to avert the consequences of building a Metro depot in the Aarey Colony – flooding and loss of open space & wildlife.

To see this video scroll down to October 15th https://www.facebook.com/zoru.bhathena

Ominous: another activist explains “The government must wait for the final verdict. Instead, they are filling up the 30-hectare plot with debris. The plot is on the Mithi river’s bank. Mumbai is witnessing frequent incidents of flooding. Aarey has flooded this year. What happens once the flood plain is filled up?”  

 

 

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Two Bristol energy enterprises

Bristol Energy, owned by Bristol City Council which has invested £15.3m in the business, offers gas and electricity for domestic and business customers across Bristol, the South West and nationwide:

  • offering fair and transparent tariffs
  • reinvesting in local communities
  • supporting and investing in local renewables

Its profits will go straight back into Bristol, helping local communities, but its primary aim is to help people out of fuel poverty, donate to charity, and use renewables.

A May BBC report said that the firm’s ‘customer take-up’ was lower than expected but after revising its original business plan it is now said to be hitting those targets. Bristol Energy’s managing director Peter Haigh said that more than 80,000 customers have now signed up and the firm aims to return a profit by 2021 after revising its original 2019 target date.

The Bristol Energy Hub is the firm’s customer service point and events space, located on Bristol’s Harbourside.

The team there will help with:

Read more here: http://hub.communityenergyengland.org/projects/

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Bristol 24/7 produces a free monthly print magazine. An article on its website brings news of Bristol Energy Cooperative (BEC), now said to be the UK’s largest community energy company, having raised £9 million since November 2016

Projects under development include a 4.6 MWp operational ground array at Puriton near Hinkley Point, Somerset, c.20 roof-top arrays on community buildings across Bristol and a 4.2 MWp site at Lawrence Weston (near Avonmouth). Read more about its ‘community partners’ here: http://www.bristolenergy.coop/community-partners.html.

The co-operative’s latest bond offer closed on 3st1 August 2017 raising over £700,000. Projects funded by this include the purchase of a 100kW Tesla battery from Elon Musk’s  ‘gigafactory’ in Nevada. Designed for efficiency and long-life, it will provide 100kW peak capacity with 170kWh energy storage. It will be used on a new HAB (sustainable housing) site in Winchester, managed by the co-operative’s partner, Bristol-based start-up CEPRO (Clean Energy Prospector).

Investor members were paid the target interest rate on their investment for the four years that schemes have been operating. Surplus profits from the schemes are paid into a community fund which has helped to fund free advice sessions on energy deals, bill management and maximising energy savings.

Read on here: http://www.bristolenergy.coop/about-us.html

 

 

 

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