An all-electric taxi, releasing no emissions into the local environment

The 100% electric Dynamo taxi manufactured in Coventry has been created by Dynamo Motor Company – a division of ADV Manufacturing – in conjunction with Nissan. It was launched at the Private Hire & Taxi Exhibition at the MK Arena in Milton Keynes.

The vehicle, which the firm had spent several years developing, has been designed for use in towns and cities aiming to reduce their emissions levels. It will comply with Transport for London’s stringent operating requirements as well as new zero emission legislation coming into force in January 2018.

The five-seat Dynamo taxi, with full side wheelchair access, will have a range of 100 miles and can be re-charged in 30 minutes when using a Rapid Charge Post. As more of these are being installed throughout the country, its major cities and towns will be connected by charging hubs and drivers of electric vehicles will no longer need to make detailed plans for longer journeys.

Brendan O’Toole, chairman at Dynamo said “We’re at the start of the biggest change in the motoring world since the era of Henry Ford because most of us will be driving electric vehicles in the future. This is a pioneering new chapter in motoring and, if anything, driver selection of electric cars will continue to accelerate since they provide zero emissions for the environment which is important as we all continue to learn more about the damage to our health from pollution.”

The company plans to start selling the regional Dynamo taxi vehicle in the summer and is hoping the London version will be on sale in the autumn.

Ed: though electric vehicles emit no emissions into the local environment we must look forward to a day when they run on electricity generated by solar, wind, hydro and tidal installations. Coal and oil power stations release sulphur dioxide gas, which causes breathing problems and contributes to acid rain and carbon dioxide, which adds to the greenhouse effect and increases global warming. 

Renewable energy storage – by rail

Energy grids supplied by renewable energy sources benefit from energy storage of any kind. “Pumped” hydropower is one of the common solutions, pumping water to higher elevations to take advantage of the power of gravity to power turbines downslope.

A new rail system on the west coast of America, designed and manufactured by a Californian company, Advanced Rail Energy Storage (ARES), offers storage which doesn’t require the use of water and is suitable for a wider variety of areas with minimal environmental impact.

No valleys need to be flooded or large scale excavations undertaken to make reservoirs. It is basically a “grid-scale flywheel or battery, but one which is able to “lock into direct synchronization with the grid providing heavy inertia for added grid stability” according to William Peitzke, ARES’ Director of Technology Development. The system is said to have a higher energy-to-power ratio than flywheels and lower life-cycle costs compared with batteries and faster ramp-up rates than pumped storage alternatives. Francesca Cava, an ARES spokeswoman, claims an 85% efficiency “That’s what you get with steel wheels on steel track.” More detail here.

Wired explains that when the local utility has surplus electricity, it powers up the electric motors that drag 9,600 tons of rock- and concrete-filled railcars up a 2,000-foot hill. When it’s got a deficit, 9,600 tons of railcar rumble down, and those motors generate electricity via regenerative braking in the same way as the Toyota Prius. Effectively, all the energy used to move the train up the hill is stored and recouped when it comes back down.

In 2016, ARES conducted a pilot system test in Tehachapi, California on a 268-meter track. After this test proved the concept, the company was granted permission to construct the grid energy system in Nevada. The fleet of automated 300-ton electric traction drive shuttle trains are due for completion anytime soon. These shuttles will travel up and down a 7.2% grade slope and should provide 50 MW of rapid response power to help stabilize the Californian electrical grid supply, responding to increased or decreased demand within seconds.

Or as the local Pahrump Valley Times puts it: “Using a solitary railroad track placed on a gentle grade, multiple electric locomotive cars can move up the track as they receive excess power from solar and wind power plants during sunny and windy days. The train cars will be active and will be dispatched slowly downhill, using their motor-generators to return power to the electricity grid as needed”.

At the turn of the millennium, California routinely suffered blackouts and power shortages. Since then billions of dollars have been invested in renewable energy and now its problem is not too little power but too much. Wet weather last winter and a windy, sunny spring have contributed to record hydro, wind and solar output and on numerous occasions in recent months the state has been producing more power than it needs.

Following the success of the test on a 268-meter track, ARES was granted permission to construct the grid energy system in Nevada, receiving approval from the Bureau of Land Management for its 5.5-mile track, and construction of the energy train is starting now: Spring 2017.

 

 

 

 

Solihull, Leeds and Manchester aim to reduce air pollution and ease traffic congestion

Employees at Blythe Valley Park in Solihull can now use a free shuttle bus from Solihull and Birmingham International to and around this business park. The colourful, eye-catching shuttle bus service is operated by Solihull-based transport service provider LandFlight, formerly known as Silverline. It runs 16 daily shuttles, each accommodating up to 60 people, between the park and the two rail stations.

Deborah Fennell, park manager at Blythe Valley Park, said: “This bus service not only helps us reduce our collective carbon footprint but also ensures that parking demands continue to be met without impacting on the space and facilities we can offer businesses. By providing complimentary and convenient connections between the park and nearby rail stations, we encourage visitors and employees at the park to use public transport for their commute.”

The owners of the park, IM Properties, introduced this service to encourage park employees to commute via public transport. Approximately 2,700 people working for the park’s 24 companies and more will come on as site continues to develop.

Water taxi used in Leeds, advocated for use between Icknield Port and congested, polluted Birmingham city centre:

Canal or riverside business and industrial parks are able to take another measure to reduce air pollution and ease traffic congestion by extending the use of water buses for passengers, already operating in a number of cities (above), and larger vessels for bulky freight (below).

In Trafford Park which has transport links by road, rail, water and air, businessman Graham Dixon advocates using Manchester’s waterways rather than clogging up the road network with cargo. He has welcomed the first arrival – a 2300 tonne ship, RMS Duisburg, which brought two large silos from Germany, bound for a Manchester factory.

Dixon’s ultimate vision is for Esprit’s Trafford Docks which he has re-opened and refitted, to be busy once again, bringing bulk goods such as road salt, aggregates, grain and biomass via the Manchester Ship Canal into Manchester. This would remove many lorries from the surrounding roads, reducing congestion and pollution.

As he said: “If one ship brings 3000 tonnes of freight up the canal, that’s over 100 lorry journeys removed from the roads, requiring only the first and the final few miles to be carried by lorry instead of potentially hundreds of miles.”

 

 

What went right? January to March 2017

From political upheaval to natural disasters, the first three months of 2017 have seen many challenges. But behind the headlines, there are signs of progress and possibility. Here are 20 of our favourites

  1. China is planning a national park three times larger than Yellowstone in the US, to help boost the wild population of giant panda. It will link 67 existing reserves to make mating easier
  2. A seven per cent annual drop in teenage suicide attempts among US high school students is linked to the legislation of same-sex marriage, say researchers
  3. More than 30 million people in Kerala, India, will given access to free WiFi after the state declared it a basic human right
  4. El Salvador became the first country in the world to ban metal mining
  5. Clean energy jobs in the US now outnumber jobs in oil and gas by five to one
  6. Denmark announced it has reduced food waste by 25 per cent in five years
  7. Experts revealed that 86 per cent of new power in Europe came from renewable energy sources in 2016 with wind energy overtaking coal as the largest form of power capacity
  8. The world’s largest fund manager, BlackRock, has warned it will vote out directors of companies who fail to address the risks posed to their businesses by climate change
  9. A teenager is on track to plant a trillion trees. Felix Finkbeiner, 19, who began his tree-planting quest when he was nine, founded environmental group Plant for the Planet. It has overseen the planting of more than 14bn trees in 130 countries and aims to plant 1tn – 150 trees for every person on Earth
  10. The value of UK ethical markets grew to almost double that of tobacco, new research suggests

Read on here for the other ten points; https://www.positive.news/2017/society/media/26491/went-right-jan-mar-2017/?mc_cid=e55ab60695&mc_eid=99a7ecd039

 

 

 

A good report from the Ecology Building Society

The Ecology Building Society is dedicated to improving the environment by supporting and promoting ecological building practices and sustainable communities.

It aims to build a greener society by providing mortgages for properties and projects that adopt environmental building practices and improve the energy efficiency of the UK’s building stock, funded through their range of simple, transparent savings accounts.

History

In 1980, during a conference of the Ecology Party (the forerunner of the current UK Green Party), a Yorkshire based solicitor complained of the difficulty he had in finding a mortgage for a property needing extensive renovation. Someone asked ‘Why don’t we start our own building society?’ In those days, a building society could be started with just £5,000. Ten people put in £500 each and some of those still save with the society. It began trading in 1981, from a tiny upstairs office in Cross Hills, West Yorkshire, just a few miles from the current headquarters’ eco-build offices (section above).

April AGM approaches

Several reports have been written about this year’s progress. The first lead was a link from the Business Desk (Yorkshire), which led to an article recording another year of solid results, which continues more than 30 years of uninterrupted profitability with record assets and savings balances for 2016.

For the year to December 31, 2016, it recorded assets of £173.1m (2015: £145.9m):

  • gross lending stood at £30.7m (2015: £42.1m)
  • savings balances rose to £163.1m (2015: £134.7m)
  • and net profit increased to £920,000 (2015: £881,000).

In 2016 Ecology lent more than £30.7m for sustainable properties and projects, with 94% of mortgages advanced on residential properties, including new builds, renovations and shared ownership, and 6% on community-led housing, including charities, housing co-operatives and community businesses. Chief executive Paul Ellis (left) said: “Our priority for 2017 is to continue to grow our mortgage book, particularly supporting more and more people to renovate their homes to a high environmental standard.

“Our financial success is based on sticking to our core principles: thinking long-term, putting our members first and focussing on our social and environmental impact”.

 

 

 

Lambeth patients, doctors, nurses and local residents create food-growing NHS gardens

A food co-operative set up by a GP surgery is helping patients to grow food in Lambeth, one of London’s most deprived boroughs. Set up in 2013, the Lambeth GP Food Co-op includes patients, doctors, nurses and local residents who created a network of food-growing NHS gardens.

On 23 March, it launched a new venture with Stockwell GPs – building gardens at their surgeries. The initiative – inspired by the work of food co-ops across the UK and abroad – started at three GP practices, with initial funding of £160,000 from the clinical commissioning group and Lambeth Council.

As part of the project, 11 GP surgeries across the borough have turned unused outdoor space into gardens where patients can grow fruit and vegetables. The produce is sold in King’s College Hospital via a market stall, a joint venture with Medirest, the hospital’s catering supplier.

Preparing the raised grow-boxes used for growing food near Lambeth surgeries. Read more here.

As well as helping patients with long-term health conditions, the co-op aims to influence food procurement within the NHS, serving both an economic and a therapeutic purpose. Its long-term aim is to encourage NHS hospitals to buy locally sourced food by drawing on community capacity to grow food in an urban environment, engaging patients in the management of the co-op. The patient group makes decisions on what is planted, what happens to the produce, when meetings are held and whether they should get involved in other food-growing activities.

The benefits of gardens and gardening on health are highlighted in a report by the King’s Fund. These include reductions in depression and anxiety, improved social functioning and wider effects, including opportunities for vocational development.

 

 

 

 

Rooftop solar power systems on India’s railway stations funded by coal tax

Saurabh Mahapatra is a young solar enthusiast from India who has reported on emerging solar power markets in several countries. On the Clean Technica website, he records that in  February’s union budget Indian Finance Minister Arun Jaitley announced that 7,000 railway stations will be fed with solar power as part of the Indian Railways’ mission to implement 1,000 megawatts of solar power capacity.

The minister stated that work to set up rooftop solar power systems at 300 stations has already started, and this number will increase to 2,000 stations.

According to data released by the Minister of Railways, India had 7,137 railway stations at the end of March 2015. The project developer will sign a long-term power purchase agreement with Indian Railways.

In addition to rooftop solar power systems (above, Udaipur station), Indian Railways earlier announced plans to launchtender for 150 megawatts (MW) of rooftop systems. IR entered into a partnership with the United Nations Development Programme to set up 5 gigawatts of solar power capacity.

Indian Railways has identified solar power resources in two states so far — Gujarat and Rajasthan — where 25 MW of rooftop and 50 MW of ground-mounted capacity is to be commissioned in the first phase of the program. In the second phase, 60 MW of rooftop and 660 MW of ground-mounted capacity will be installed in nine other states. During the third phase, 400 MW of rooftop and 3,800 MW of ground-mounted capacity will be installed in the rest of the country.

Sputnik International adds that to pay for these solar platforms, as well as other renewable energy sources, India has collected $1.8 billion in taxes on coal mined in India and imported from elsewhere. The revenue from the tax has also gone to cleaning drinking water and conserving forests. India has collected about $8 billion from the coal tax, about 40% of which has gone to the National Clean Energy Fund (NCEF).