LLECP ‘strongly encourages’ developers to transport materials by rail or waterway

 londonlecp header

The London Low Emission Construction Partnership (LLECP) is a project funded by the Mayor of London and Transport for London as part of the Mayors Air Quality Fund. 

LLECP is a partnership between the ‘Cleaner Air Boroughs of Camden, King’s College London, Hammersmith, Fulham, Islington, Lambeth, Lewisham, Wandsworth and industry partners across the demolition and construction sectors.

In 2015, Air Quality News reported that the LLECP website, aimed at helping the construction industry to understand its impact on air quality and encourage pollution reduction measures, had been launched by King’s College London.

The site notes that as emissions from road vehicles can significantly add to levels of local air pollution, developers with construction sites close to waterways or railways are strongly encouraged to assess the viability and feasibility for construction materials to be delivered or removed by these means, rather than by road. The benefit of this is the reduction in the number of trips made by HGVs on local roads, reducing local emissions. Even modern diesel or petrol powered plant items emit higher levels of PM and NOx than electric equivalents. Therefore, wherever possible, renewable, mains or battery powered plant items should be used.

Reducing emissions from vehicles transporting construction materials

Science Daily says (drawing on material from the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology) that one of the most efficient means of transporting freight is by water. It points out, however, that many vessels sailing today are powered by aging diesel motors fitted with neither exhaust cleaning equipment nor modern control systems.

ross barlow city backgroundThe converted hydrogen-fuelled barge “Ross Barlow” with the Empa-developed hydride storage tank.Credit: Image courtesy of Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA).

The EMPA report describes the University of Birmingham’s ‘ambitious trial’, converting a canal barge to be the first in the world to use hydrogen fuel.

In 2010 the converted boat, the “Ross Barlow,” made its longest voyage to date, of four days duration and 105 km length, negotiating no less than 58 locks.

The boat holds its hydrogen in powder form – metal hydride – which could offer a safer and cheaper use of hydrogen.

Cenex, the UK’s Centre of Excellence for Low Carbon and Fuel Cell technologies, supports the early market development for low carbon vehicles including electric, hybrid, bio-methane and hydrogen powered vehicles. Cenex also works with clients to increase the use of alternative fuels in the UK through the addition of infrastructure including electric vehicle charge points, gas and hydrogen stations.

Will Cenex extend its remit to increase the use of alternative fuels on vessels sailing on our rivers and waterways?

 

 

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