Category Archives: Hydropower

Level-headed Scotland forges ahead

From time to time good news comes from Scotland and – after March’s items prompted a document search – 1097 items in which Scotland was mentioned were found. The following news items were selected and arranged simply because the country was named in the title of the file. Due to the lapse of time some links no longer work – these are marked with a cross

2004 – a fairer, less stressful house purchasing system

When you buy a house in Scotland, if your offer is accepted, you are immediately under an obligation to buy that property. This is why an agreement in principle is required before you go house-hunting. By contrast, in England and Wales, you can pull out of buying the property without penalty up until the time when contracts are exchanged. The Scottish vendor is also committed to the deal as soon as he accepts the buyer’s offer. Hence the risk of gazumping (where the vendor later accepts a higher offer from someone else) is removed. http://www.icplanning.co.uk/buying_scotland.shtml x

2004 – unfluoridated water

The Scottish Executive axed the proposal to add fluoride to the country’s water in favour of better targeted dental services.

2005 – taking freight off the roads

Councillor Julia Southcott, Convener of East Dunbartonshire’s Development & Environment Committee said “Reusing the canal for transporting freight is one of the key sustainability options being investigated.” http://www.waterscape.com/news/nid45 x Since then, though constrained by lack of funding, the Scottish government has endeavoured to preserve its shipbuilding capacity and maintain and use its waterways.

The Timberlink project, collaboration between ports, British Waterways and forestry companies, provides a good example of shifting traffic to waterways. 

2007 – fair trade in food

Points made in a report written by The Church of Scotland’s Church and Society Council, focussing on the need for fair trade in food, unusually considering Scottish farmers as well as those in the two-thirds world, included these points:

The major buyers of domestic production are the supermarkets and their suppliers who control most of the food bought for home consumption. Directly or through the food supply chain farmers must sell to large multinational businesses.

The current distribution of resources within the food supply chain is out of balance with effort and risk. The food supply chain represents a market failure. There is need to increase the bargaining power of primary producers if they are to survive.

The power of the multiples and the detached attitude of government seem likely to result in an increasing proportion of UK consumption being sourced from outwith the UK. To pay more for food than the market rate might seem contrary to supermarkets responsibility to their shareholders. However this market rate is determined by these major buyers. Change in practice would require a revision of the current concept of corporate responsibility.

2008 – re-opening a railway

The Stirling–Alloa–Kincardine rail link , which was re-opened for the first time in almost 40 years, is delivering economic, social and environmental benefits to the communities directly concerned and to the wider Scottish economy. The government website adds that there are direct hourly passenger services between Alloa, Stirling and Glasgow Queen Street and peak-time services to and from Edinburgh, Monday to Friday.

The line also offers freight services along the line and provides the option for diverting freight trains from the existing, longer route via the Forth Bridge.

2008 – no more PFI

Other measures were noted. The devolved government in Scotland has acted energetically to improve the lives of many electors. Scottish measures to help the frail elderly and students are well known but far more is being done. The Scottish Government announced that the new South Glasgow Hospital would be publicly funded instead of using the expensive and often unreliable PFI system.

2008 – Scottish food for Scottish people

The government is aiming to see more beef, lamb, pig, chicken, fruit, salmon and white fish processed in Scotland rather than being exported. The Rural Affairs secretary Richard Lochhead said “I would like to see more Scottish food ending up on our plates.”

2008 – no more nuclear power

Tidal and wave generated renewable energy, hydropower and offshore wind is being backed. Alex Salmond explained that it has no need to install more nuclear power, ‘a dirty technology’, in which it has no advantage.

More energy is now generated in Scotland by renewables than nuclear power and exports of electricity to UK rose by 50% last year.

2013 – Community land reform

Remote crofting communities are being enabled to flourish and Scots have been given the right to buy land they’ve worked for years. The Agricultural Holdings Review which was launched to examine the situation of land ownership and use, tenant-owner relationships, and the relevant legislation eventually led to Land Reform (Scotland) Bill to the Scottish Parliament  passed by the Scottish Parliament on 16 March 2016. It created a Community Right to Buy for Sustainable Development. Like the earlier Crofting Community Right to Buy and the Community Right to Buy abandoned or derelict land, the Community Right to Buy for Sustainable Development does not require a willing seller but allows ministers to compel landowners to sell if they decide that the sale will further sustainable development in the area.

2015 – GM crops ban

Scotland banned the use of all genetically modified crops in a move which the government says will preserve the country’s “clean and green brand”. There was “no evidence” of a demand for GM crops among consumers in Scotland, The SNP rural affairs secretary Richard Lochhead said, adding: “The Scottish Government has long-standing concerns about GM crops – concerns that are shared by other European countries and consumers, and which should not be dismissed lightly.”

2016 – MSPs back fracking ban

MSPs backed an outright ban on fracking proposed by Scottish Labour. There are ongoing calls for first minister Nicola Sturgeon’s temporary prohibition or moratorium on the technology being used in Scotland to be made permanent.

2017 – basic income trial

Four Scottish councils are to undertake feasibility studies and to develop pilot models for the first pilot basic income schemes in the UK, with the support of a £250,000 grant announced by the Scottish government last month. This funding will cover the financial years 2018-19 and 2019-20

2019 – call to recognise state of Palestine

A cross-party coalition of Scottish politicians urges Britain to uphold the rule of law and recognise the state of Palestine.

2019 – dignity in dying

On March 31, The Sunday Times reported that a group of nine MSPs has called for dignity in death for people who face ‘terrible suffering’ called to mind many other reports of beneficial developments in Scotland.

 

 

 

 

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Kenya’s government invests in geothermal energy

Kenya is the first African country to develop geothermal energy. It is  diversifying from hydropower, which currently provides most of Kenya’s electricity, because its capacity has been seriously reduced by the worst drought since the 2011 – and further droughts are anticipated.

Geothermal energy comes from a mixture of water and steam under pressure drawn from nearly 2 km beneath the earth, in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley (above). It is providing reliable, cost-competitive, baseload power with a small carbon footprint.

Only 10% of Kenya’s population has electricity for their homes, so this project will help more people to have a better lifestyle. The energy is going to be used for household needs such as heated water and electricity.

There are concerns about the adverse effects of installing the pipeline infrastructure on vegetation, wildlife and the nomadic way of life

But as an employee of Kenya Electricity Generating Company said: “It is a clean energy, or green, because its carbon footprint on the environment is minimal”.

This is a state conceived and managed achievement – now part of

which focusses on reforms and development across 10 key sectors. 

The state’s role is possibly deplored by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network , an alliance of organisations headed by PricewaterhouseCoopers, a powerful accountancy firm (one of the Big 4) with a chequered history. They conducted a study which found that Kenya has ‘put little focus’ on involving the private sector in risk mitigation – insurance? – and flows of significant private sector finance.

Long may it be so.

 

 

 

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Swiss voters embrace shift to renewables and ban new nuclear plants

Reuter journalists Michael Shields and John Miller reported from Zurich that Swiss voters have backed the government’s plan to provide billions of dollars in subsidies for renewable energy, ban new nuclear plants and help to bail out struggling utilities in a binding referendum.

The Swiss initiative mirrors efforts elsewhere in Europe to reduce dependence on nuclear power, partly sparked by Japan’s Fukushima disaster in 2011. Germany aims to phase out nuclear power by 2022, while Austria banned it decades ago. “The results shows the population wants a new energy policy and does not want any new nuclear plants,” Energy Minister Doris Leuthard said:

“The law will boost domestic renewable energy, cut fossil fuel use and reduce reliance on foreign supplies”.

Leuthard said the package would cost the average family 40 francs more a year, based on a higher grid surcharge to fund renewable subsidies. Under the law, 480 million francs will be raised annually from electricity users to fund investment in wind, solar and hydro power. An additional 450 million francs will be set aside from an existing fossil fuels tax to help cut energy use in buildings by 43 percent by 2035 compared with 2000 levels.

Solar and wind now account for less than 5% of Switzerland’s energy output, compared with 60% for hydro and 35% for nuclear. Under the new law, power from solar, wind, biomass and geothermal sources would rise to at least 11,400 gigawatt hours (GWh) by 2035 from 2,831 GWh now.

Most parties and environmentalists hailed the result. “The voting public has … paved the way for a future that builds on sustainability, renewable energies and energy efficiency. Today’s decision is good for the climate, the environment, our jobs, the Swiss economy and the whole population,” the Social Democrats said.

The growing number of American visitors to this site (left) will contrast this decision with the stance of Myron Ebell, who led President Donald Trump’s transition team for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He recently complained that the new administration is moving too slowly to unravel climate change regulations.

 

Visitors from 10 countries came to this site in May. Noting the Slovenian contacts we were pleased to read that the European Commission has agreed to finance a grid-integration project between Slovenia and Croatia through the Connecting Europe Facility. It will improve the links between the electricity grids of Slovenia and Croatia, and drive renewable energy development across the region, allowing smaller power producers to participate in the local market, and including storage solutions in order to stabilize security of energy supply. Source: https://www.pv-magazine.com/2017/05/22/eu-supports-integration-of-renewables-between-croatia-and-slovenia-with-e40-million/

 

 

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An all-electric taxi, releasing no emissions into the local environment

The 100% electric Dynamo taxi manufactured in Coventry has been created by Dynamo Motor Company – a division of ADV Manufacturing – in conjunction with Nissan. It was launched at the Private Hire & Taxi Exhibition at the MK Arena in Milton Keynes.

The vehicle, which the firm had spent several years developing, has been designed for use in towns and cities aiming to reduce their emissions levels. It will comply with Transport for London’s stringent operating requirements as well as new zero emission legislation coming into force in January 2018.

The five-seat Dynamo taxi, with full side wheelchair access, will have a range of 100 miles and can be re-charged in 30 minutes when using a Rapid Charge Post. As more of these are being installed throughout the country, its major cities and towns will be connected by charging hubs and drivers of electric vehicles will no longer need to make detailed plans for longer journeys.

Brendan O’Toole, chairman at Dynamo said “We’re at the start of the biggest change in the motoring world since the era of Henry Ford because most of us will be driving electric vehicles in the future. This is a pioneering new chapter in motoring and, if anything, driver selection of electric cars will continue to accelerate since they provide zero emissions for the environment which is important as we all continue to learn more about the damage to our health from pollution.”

The company plans to start selling the regional Dynamo taxi vehicle in the summer and is hoping the London version will be on sale in the autumn.

Ed: though electric vehicles emit no emissions into the local environment we must look forward to a day when they run on electricity generated by solar, wind, hydro and tidal installations. Coal and oil power stations release sulphur dioxide gas, which causes breathing problems and contributes to acid rain and carbon dioxide, which adds to the greenhouse effect and increases global warming. 

Costa Rica celebrates 113 days of 100% renewable energy

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As three of the world’s biggest insurers called on G20 leaders to implement a timeframe for the end of fossil fuel subsidies when they met in China, Costa Rica led the way.

In 2009, President Arias declared a goal of making Costa Rica the world’s first carbon neutral country, reducing net global warming emissions to zero.

With a 113-day stretch of 100-percent renewable energy under its belt and several months left in the year, Costa Rica is edging closer to its target. Costa Rica could be on track to match the record set with its renewable energy production last year, which accounted for 99 percent of the country’s electricity. That included 285 days powered completely by renewable sources, according to the Costa Rican Electricity Institute. Related: Costa Rica achieved 99-percent renewable energy use in 2015

Costa Rica is able to take advantage of a multitude of renewable energy sources because of its unique climate and terrain. Most of the nation’s renewable energy comes from hydropower, due to its large river system and heavy tropical rainfalls. Solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal energy also play key roles.

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The tropical nation aims to be free from fossil fuels in just five years. With hefty investments in geothermal energy projects and a forecast for more heavy rains in the coming years, that goal could be accomplished even sooner than originally planned.

In 2015 Costa Rica achieved 99% renewable energy

Costa Rica’s lush jungles and waterfalls make hydropower one of the most accessible natural energy resources in the country, yet geothermal plants are catching up quickly, and officials hope to continue to build this and other industries. A statement from earlier this month boasted 100% renewable energy use for 285 days this year. Albeit a truly impressive achievement, the country’s goal is still 100 percent independence from fossil fuels all year.

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Wind, biomass, and solar power are also viable alternative energy sources. With the focus shifting toward addressing fossil fuel used in the transportation sector, the country hopes to hit its goal of being carbon-neutral by 2021. Costa Rican citizens seem to be behind the measures, especially as they have seen energy costs drop 12% over the last year, with future projections dropping even more.

 

 

Harlaw hydro is now generating clean energy

In an earlier post it was reported that Ribble Valley members of Transition Town Clitheroe aimed to develop greater community resilience to cope with reduced future availability of fossil fuels and to adapt to climate change. They floated a community share offer in 2013 to raise money to generate community-owned clean energy on the River Calder.

harlaw reservoir 2

 

 

 

 

The Scottish Farmer has now added news of another hydro project based at the Harlaw reservoir (above), outside Balerno, near Edinburgh, first mentioned on this site in 2013. The organisers found an upgrade of the existing micro-hydro scheme at Harlaw Reservoir a positive experience and are keen to share the benefits of such an investment, particularly as part of a community project.

The project aimed to provide an independent green energy source and income for the local community. Chairman and director of the community group, Martin Petty recalls that a village trust had been established to help the community and the hydro project was proposed. After a consultation, a co-op which offered shares in the project was set up. A feasibility study in 2010 confirmed that it was a practical and profitable proposition and after four years of planning, meetings and obtaining approvals, the group were in a position to build the project in July, 2014. Work started in September, 2014, and was completed in August, 2015, with the formal opening by the Minister for Business, Energy and Tourism, Fergus Ewing, taking place on September 1, 2015.

Harlaw Hydro Ltd is now known as a bona fide co-operative society (BENCOM) and it is registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965, rather than as a company under the Companies Act. The society has seven directors and 250 shareholders, who together raised nearly £400,000.The profits generated by selling power to the grid will be used to sustain the scheme in the first place, pay the shareholders a dividend, and then benefit the local community.

harlaw pump house

The 95kW system will take water from the dam’s penstocks (reservoir dam outflows), returning flow to the dam discharge channel prior to it, forming Bavelaw Burn. A new turbine house (above) is located to the north east of the discharge channel, at the foot of the reservoir dam, immediately south of the disused building.The scheme will generate approximately 260,000kWh of green electricity per year – enough for approximately 100 average houses – saving 129 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year.

The project was the first in Scotland of its type and Mr Petty feels it has set an example to other communities: “Communities across Scotland have been energised by this project, and they’ve come to us as a point of advice, and now a number of others are doing the same as us. It’s great to see, and it’s great to be that point of contact.”

Commenting on the project, Mr Petty added: “We were lucky to have a great group of people on the engineer team, which was luckily made up of men who are all, or have been, engineers. The team included a mechanical, charted civil and electrical engineers, as well as a geologist and an architect, all of whom worked on a voluntary basis, so we were really lucky with that.”

Interesting article about pumped storage systems in Scotland: http://www.scotsrenewables.com/blog/distributionandstorage/pumped-storage-hydro-in-scotland/