Category Archives: Transport

Citizens of Madrid preserve the city’s environmental legislation

 

In a November ’18 article El Pais reported that the European Commission had set 2020 as the deadline for member states to reach its targets and that – to this end – London, Milan, Stockholm and Gothenburg have introduced fees to access the city centre.

City Hall’s Madrid Central program was launched on November 30, 2018 to curb air pollution and increase pedestrianised space. 472 hectares of the city centre were made off-limits to traffic, except for local residents and public transportation. Some private vehicles could also enter the area to park in a public parking lot.

The project is part of a larger move to improve the quality and safety of a space that is shared by cars, motorcycles, pedestrians, bicycles and a growing number of personal mobility devices.

El Pais reported in March that, according to a study conducted by the Technical University of Madrid measuring the environmental impact of Madrid Central, emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx), a polluting gas released by vehicles, fell by 38% in the first month the program was implemented, while carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions dropped by 14.2%.

Air quality in Madrid citycentre has also improved, with pollution falling by 8.9% compared with the historic average for the December-March period, according to measurements taken from the Plaza del Carmen monitoring station, located within the Madrid Central area.

Madrid’s new city council, elected in June, is now led by the conservative People’s party (PP) and the centre-right Citizens party, backed by the far-right Vox. Spain’s National Public Radio website recorded that Madrid’s new conservative Mayor Jose Luis Almeida temporarily halted the project in July, saying that he wanted to replace it.

Days after taking office it announced moves to begin rolling back the Madrid Central zone. The Guardian reported:

There were mass public protests (pictured above) as people supported the measure and environmental groups appealed against the decision to abandon the scheme and a judge in an administrative court ruled in their favour, saying that pollution in Madrid could not be allowed to rise uncontrollably.

 

 

 

o

Advertisements

Cleaning London’s air and cutting road deaths in the capital

The first of five plans for transport backed by Transport for London is a project to ship thousands of tons of waste generated by the growing houseboat population, by barge instead of by road-going refuse trucks.

Air pollution created by refuse truck trips will be significantly reduced as tons of waste is moved by water-freight, cutting 2.4 tonnes of CO2 a year. Houseboat waste is sorted into different bags before being collected by barges and taken to processing depots. The scheme, run by social enterprise iRecycle and Powerday, a London-based waste management company, originated at Camden Market where food waste being recycled rose from zero to 40%.

iRecycle transports the majority of their clients’ waste on barges powered by bio-diesel produced from the used cooking oil they collect. As part of the circular economy, its food & beverage clients are encouraged to buy from the farms that use their fertiliser created from food waste.

The amount collected — boosted by the addition of house-boat waste — will rise to 60%, eventually cutting thousands of road trips by refuse trucks. Air pollution will be further reduced when all 1,880 boats on London’s waterways use the service. For other advantages of inland waterway freight see the 2019 Gosling report.

anti Dennis-Eagle-Elite-6The Thames Tideway company has invested in a new fleet of 22 high vision “low entry cab” trucks designed to be safer for pedestrians and cyclists. These cabs have windows specially designed to improve drivers’ vision, allowing them to spot vulnerable road users more easily. The extra-wide and low windows are especially effective at helping drivers to spot cyclists getting too close, especially at junctions and crossings.

In a ground-breaking scheme, new cycle freight infrastructure is being created close to Archway station to promote zero-emission deliveries.

Equipped with electric-bike charging points, the depot will have space for 10 cargo bikes at one time. It is aimed at minimising diesel and petrol vehicle deliveries by providing additional storage for businesses that do not have enough of their own.

Five large underground waste bunkers are being created in Vauxhall, by Business Improvement District Vauxhall One. Local business waste stored in the bunkers will be collected by the BID’s zero-emission electric vehicle on a bi-weekly basis. The truck, converted from a truck currently used to jet-wash pavements and collect fly-tipping, will remove a third of the existing recycling trips in the area.

Electric vans are travelling to businesses to collect waste — replacing trips made by diesel trucks. The vans return the waste to Borough Market where it is processed and then consolidated in the market’s compactors. 28 tonnes of waste have been collected by zero-emission vehicles since April, saving 70 diesel vehicle trips a week, re-timed to avoid the busiest times. Participating businesses are offered free recycling collections.

Goods vehicle movements in London have increased by around 20% since 2010, contributing to poor air quality, congestion and road danger; the five plans made by Transport for London, outlined above, will reduce air pollution and road accidents. 

 

 

 

o

Level-headed Scotland forges ahead

From time to time good news comes from Scotland and – after March’s items prompted a document search – 1097 items in which Scotland was mentioned were found. The following news items were selected and arranged simply because the country was named in the title of the file. Due to the lapse of time some links no longer work – these are marked with a cross

2004 – a fairer, less stressful house purchasing system

When you buy a house in Scotland, if your offer is accepted, you are immediately under an obligation to buy that property. This is why an agreement in principle is required before you go house-hunting. By contrast, in England and Wales, you can pull out of buying the property without penalty up until the time when contracts are exchanged. The Scottish vendor is also committed to the deal as soon as he accepts the buyer’s offer. Hence the risk of gazumping (where the vendor later accepts a higher offer from someone else) is removed. http://www.icplanning.co.uk/buying_scotland.shtml x

2004 – unfluoridated water

The Scottish Executive axed the proposal to add fluoride to the country’s water in favour of better targeted dental services.

2005 – taking freight off the roads

Councillor Julia Southcott, Convener of East Dunbartonshire’s Development & Environment Committee said “Reusing the canal for transporting freight is one of the key sustainability options being investigated.” http://www.waterscape.com/news/nid45 x Since then, though constrained by lack of funding, the Scottish government has endeavoured to preserve its shipbuilding capacity and maintain and use its waterways.

The Timberlink project, collaboration between ports, British Waterways and forestry companies, provides a good example of shifting traffic to waterways. 

2007 – fair trade in food

Points made in a report written by The Church of Scotland’s Church and Society Council, focussing on the need for fair trade in food, unusually considering Scottish farmers as well as those in the two-thirds world, included these points:

The major buyers of domestic production are the supermarkets and their suppliers who control most of the food bought for home consumption. Directly or through the food supply chain farmers must sell to large multinational businesses.

The current distribution of resources within the food supply chain is out of balance with effort and risk. The food supply chain represents a market failure. There is need to increase the bargaining power of primary producers if they are to survive.

The power of the multiples and the detached attitude of government seem likely to result in an increasing proportion of UK consumption being sourced from outwith the UK. To pay more for food than the market rate might seem contrary to supermarkets responsibility to their shareholders. However this market rate is determined by these major buyers. Change in practice would require a revision of the current concept of corporate responsibility.

2008 – re-opening a railway

The Stirling–Alloa–Kincardine rail link , which was re-opened for the first time in almost 40 years, is delivering economic, social and environmental benefits to the communities directly concerned and to the wider Scottish economy. The government website adds that there are direct hourly passenger services between Alloa, Stirling and Glasgow Queen Street and peak-time services to and from Edinburgh, Monday to Friday.

The line also offers freight services along the line and provides the option for diverting freight trains from the existing, longer route via the Forth Bridge.

2008 – no more PFI

Other measures were noted. The devolved government in Scotland has acted energetically to improve the lives of many electors. Scottish measures to help the frail elderly and students are well known but far more is being done. The Scottish Government announced that the new South Glasgow Hospital would be publicly funded instead of using the expensive and often unreliable PFI system.

2008 – Scottish food for Scottish people

The government is aiming to see more beef, lamb, pig, chicken, fruit, salmon and white fish processed in Scotland rather than being exported. The Rural Affairs secretary Richard Lochhead said “I would like to see more Scottish food ending up on our plates.”

2008 – no more nuclear power

Tidal and wave generated renewable energy, hydropower and offshore wind is being backed. Alex Salmond explained that it has no need to install more nuclear power, ‘a dirty technology’, in which it has no advantage.

More energy is now generated in Scotland by renewables than nuclear power and exports of electricity to UK rose by 50% last year.

2013 – Community land reform

Remote crofting communities are being enabled to flourish and Scots have been given the right to buy land they’ve worked for years. The Agricultural Holdings Review which was launched to examine the situation of land ownership and use, tenant-owner relationships, and the relevant legislation eventually led to Land Reform (Scotland) Bill to the Scottish Parliament  passed by the Scottish Parliament on 16 March 2016. It created a Community Right to Buy for Sustainable Development. Like the earlier Crofting Community Right to Buy and the Community Right to Buy abandoned or derelict land, the Community Right to Buy for Sustainable Development does not require a willing seller but allows ministers to compel landowners to sell if they decide that the sale will further sustainable development in the area.

2015 – GM crops ban

Scotland banned the use of all genetically modified crops in a move which the government says will preserve the country’s “clean and green brand”. There was “no evidence” of a demand for GM crops among consumers in Scotland, The SNP rural affairs secretary Richard Lochhead said, adding: “The Scottish Government has long-standing concerns about GM crops – concerns that are shared by other European countries and consumers, and which should not be dismissed lightly.”

2016 – MSPs back fracking ban

MSPs backed an outright ban on fracking proposed by Scottish Labour. There are ongoing calls for first minister Nicola Sturgeon’s temporary prohibition or moratorium on the technology being used in Scotland to be made permanent.

2017 – basic income trial

Four Scottish councils are to undertake feasibility studies and to develop pilot models for the first pilot basic income schemes in the UK, with the support of a £250,000 grant announced by the Scottish government last month. This funding will cover the financial years 2018-19 and 2019-20

2019 – call to recognise state of Palestine

A cross-party coalition of Scottish politicians urges Britain to uphold the rule of law and recognise the state of Palestine.

2019 – dignity in dying

On March 31, The Sunday Times reported that a group of nine MSPs has called for dignity in death for people who face ‘terrible suffering’ called to mind many other reports of beneficial developments in Scotland.

 

 

 

 

o

As government cuts affect public transport in Witney, a community transport co-operative is set up

A year ago there was a post on this site about the residents of Hawes who launched their own Little White Bus in 2011 to meet the trains at Garsdale station seven miles away. Today they have a fleet of 10 minibuses that rely on 53 volunteer drivers and nine part-time staff, ferrying 65,000 passengers a year. They also have a Land Rover to take children from the most remote farms to and from school.

On 20 July 2016, Oxfordshire county council scrapped all subsidies for bus services and 54 routes stopped altogether while many more were reduced. Dozens of villages in Oxfordshire had no bus service at all.

Witney’s town service had been run by Stagecoach before the subsidies were cut and The Guardian reported that local Labour councillor Laura Price who saw the strength of the opposition to losing the bus service and the distress it was going to cause, began to wonder what could be done.

Laura Price says: “This is about real localism – us doing things for our community who would otherwise be abandoned.”

‘Frantic tin-rattling’ raised £18,000 that bought an old bus and at the start of 2017 West Oxfordshire Community Transport co-operative was set up. People paying £1 become voting members, drivers get a proper living wage, and profits are reinvested in the business.

Like the Hawes initiative, after 16 months it not only breaks even, it’s expanding. The fleet has gone from one to four buses (none less than 10 years old). The town service runs “like a Swiss watch”. Other villages petitioned the co-operative to run a service for them and this February it began running a 210 service to Chipping Norton.

 

 

 

o

 

Mumbai’s Tree Saviour 1: neighbourhood trees

This is a brief account of a citizen of Mumbai battling – in his spare time – to prevent the destruction of trees in his city.

After realising that the fine rain trees which shaded the roads in his neighbourhood were being cut down, Zoru Bhathena discovered online that over 2000 trees had been axed due to infection by mealybugs and the municipal authority was taking no action to limit this. He points out that the problem is simply resolved: once a tree has been infected it needs to be felled to prevent the infection from spreading to healthy trees. See the latest video here:

He draws attention to the Tree Act (1975) which gives extensive instructions ofr increasing tree cover in Maharashtra – summarised below.

Zoru decided to file a public interest litigation (PIL) as well as actively campaigning with protesting neighbourhood groups and publicising the case on Facebook.

It is reported that judges presiding over the Bombay High Court (HC) hearing in 2016 asked BMC:  “Unless you conduct a tree census in a proper scientific manner with the help of experts, how will you know the situation?” The HC said it will have to examine the manner in which BMC conducts the tree census. Advocate Joaquim Reis and advocate Trupti Puranik, representing said BMC had planted about 1,546 new trees in place of the dead trees, but the petitioner’s counsel, Kainaz Irani, pointed out: “The corporations plant young saplings which do not survive”. Another report added some interesting details.

The HC said that it would focus on two issues — preservation of existing trees and the census of trees so that they can be protected and increasing the green cover, by planting more trees.  

o

Mumbai’s Tree Saviour 2: opposing destruction in Greater Mumbai’s Garden of Eden

The 2016 High Court judgment directed the BMC “to ensure that the remaining trees on the Western Express Highway are not cut or destroyed”.

However, the Indian Express reported, a year later, that the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) had already felled some trees, an action which Bhathena (right) termed a clear “contempt of court.” The MMRDA later applied to the court for a modification of the 2016 HC order in order to fell 216 more trees along the Western Express Highway for the construction of Metro 7.

The Afternoon Despatch and Courier gives the exact figures and refers to the Right to Information (RTI) filed by activist Zoru Bhathena, who had required information on the total number of trees to be cut and transplanted in the Mumbai city due to the metro project, including the construction of every metro line and car shed. According to the reply by Mumbai Metro Rail Corporation (MMRC) 1,331 trees will be cut throughout the route and 3,681 trees will be transplanted.

Bhathena commented in the Times: “The government is trying to create the impression that we are opposed to the Metro project. That is not the case. We want the car shed to be shifted to an alternate site like Kanjurmarg where it will not cause harm. Here, a pristine forest will be destroyed”.

In a focus on the fate of the Aarey Colony, where 28 hectares have been earmarked by the MMRDA and the MMRC for constructing a metro car shed over an area of. This will lead to uprooting of 2,298 trees. According to MMRDA, 2,044 of these trees could be transplanted, but the rest would be cut down. An activist comments: “And we all know the fate of most transplanted trees. It’s a farce and has so far not succeeded”.

Save Aarey informs us that this stretch of deciduous forests peopled by tribal villages, still described as a ‘Garden of Eden’, was broken up in 1949 to accommodate the Aarey dairy co-operative; “This created open ecosystems of grasslands, scrubs, marshes and water bodies, giving refuge to an interesting assemblage of species. A total of 77 species of birds, 34 species of wildflowers, 86 species of butterflies, 13 species of amphibians, 46 species of reptiles, several of these being listed under Schedule II of the Wildlife Protection Act are found here. What’s more, 16 species of mammals, including the elusive but ornamental and therefore, magnificent leopard, have been documented in Aarey. From the hundreds of micro habitats that are there in Aarey, tiny creatures rule, thrive and survive. Interestingly, species thought to have been extinct have been rediscovered from Aarey”.

In addition to public demonstrations, including visits from schoolchildren, 123,576 people have signed a petition to avert the consequences of building a Metro depot in the Aarey Colony – flooding and loss of open space & wildlife.

To see this video scroll down to October 15th https://www.facebook.com/zoru.bhathena

Ominous: another activist explains “The government must wait for the final verdict. Instead, they are filling up the 30-hectare plot with debris. The plot is on the Mithi river’s bank. Mumbai is witnessing frequent incidents of flooding. Aarey has flooded this year. What happens once the flood plain is filled up?”  

 

 

o

Hawes: as government sheds commitments, ‘we are going to provide for ourselves’

As large-scale cuts in public expenditure began to ‘bite’, the 2010 Conservative manifesto presented the Big Society as its flagship policy, later endorsed by the Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition. The Big Society Network was formed, owned by The Society Network Foundation charity. It had £2 million from the National Lottery and public-sector grants. However in July 2014, the Charity Commission investigated alleged misuse of funds by the network; it went into administration and was wound up. David Cameron did not use the term in public after 2013 and the phrase ceased to be used in government statements.

Years earlier the people of Hawes in the Yorkshire Dales were realising this vision, because, as John Blackie, a district and county councillor explained: “Here we say (to government), ‘If you aren’t going to provide for us, we are going to provide for ourselves’”.

Necessity has been the mother of invention.

Hawes: 1137 population, 683 dwellings

The Wensleydale line and Hawes railway station had closed in 1959. Then both police houses closed. Last year one of the town’s two banks left, leaving Hawes with a single branch open three days a week. “One of the big issues here is that we are losing young families; if we lose services we lose families,” Mr Blackie said. Four local schools in the Upper Dales are only half full, he added.

In 1992, Dairy Crest, its biggest employer, sold the Wensleydale Creamery, featured in the 1989 Wallace & Gromit film: ‘A Grand Day Out’.

Four of the creamery’s managers and a local businessman bought the enterprise and revived it. More than 200 people now work there and it produces 4,000 tonnes of cheese a year.

Since then the business has gone from strength to strength and a new dairy was built there in 2014.

In 1997, the community opened the Upper Wensleydale Community Partnership, in a place where people could get access to council services and pay rents and rates five days a week. Before this, a council clerk visited Hawes one day each week.

Over the years they began to run their library, post office and police station. The police moved in, using a room in the community centre which moved to a new site in 2005, bringing the library with them and opening it five days a week instead of two. These local services would have shut down if locals hadn’t volunteered to run them ‘on their own terms’. The town has a retained Fire Station, crewed by firefighters who provide on-call cover from home or their place of work.

After years of dwindling bus services the community launched its own Little White Bus in 2011 to meet the trains at Garsdale station seven miles away. Today they have a fleet of 10 minibuses that rely on 53 volunteer drivers and nine part-time staff, ferrying 65,000 passengers a year. They also have a Land Rover to take children from the most remote farms to and from school.

After the village was hit by Post Office cutbacks, the Northern Echo reported in 2014 that the Upper Wensleydale Community Partnership had voted to run a post office at the Community Office, a sorting office in the town’s business park and outreach services in Askrigg and Bainbridge. The move followed the retirement of Hawes postmaster whose departure left residents facing a 17-mile drive to the nearest post office. Councillor Blackie said he would also aim to relaunch post office services in some of the 11 villages where sub-post offices had closed over the past 17 years.

Their latest enterprise (October 2017) is taking a three-year lease of the petrol station which was closing down. They hope to install a 24-hour self-service pump and an electric charging point and – one day – to buy the site, offering community shares. It is the first in the country to be run by its community, (part-time staff and volunteers) not for profit but to save local people from making a 36-mile round trip along narrow roads to the nearest filling station open full time. Hawes is so remote that they qualify for a government rebate of 5p per litre to keep the prices down.

Many readers will wish them well as, next year, the partnership plans to buy two plots of land to build affordable homes for rent in perpetuity . . .

and as the Wensleydale Railway Association plans to rebuild the railway from Northallerton to to join the Settle-Carlisle Railway at Garsdale, re-opening the station in Hawes.